Rights and Safety for Refugees! In Memory of Khaled

They don’t really care about us –
Khaled Idris Bahray is dead

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On the morning of January 13, 2015 the refugee Kahlid Idris Bahdray (†20) was found dead in the inner yard of his appartment in Leubnitz-Neuostra, Dresden. Contrary to the first police statements, it is now certain, that Khaled was killed with several knife stabs. A racist motive cannot be ruled out at this point of time. Khaled was from Eritrea and had only been in Dresden for a few weeks. His friends are shocked and want to knwo why he was murdered. However, they also want to know why they are not safe here – in Dresden. Because of this we are meeting this Saturday to take the streets collectively. We are meeting to loudly take his friends’ questions and demands into the streets.

Why Khaled was murdered?

We still don’t know. No one knows. The normal reaction to these situations is to exclude the possibility of homicide with a racist background. Why? – The case of the homicides perpretated by the terrorist organisation National Social Underground and the murder of Oury Jalloh show exactly why. The facts of this case and reports of it from part of Khaled’s friends are clearly a prove that refugees are being threatened here. They are afraid. And they do have the right to be afraid. This fear itself is a strong motivation for going out to the streets and to protest against racism.

The Dresden police have started their investigations by fully misjudging the situation. Although Khaled’s body was found covered in blood, the police immediately excluded the possibility of an act of violence. It is a clear failure of the police department to exclude one possible cause of death before any investigation. Later and through pressure of the media and the public the homicide division took over. It has become clear: Khaled was stabbed to death. However, the initial errors have delayed the preservation of evidence for 30 hours. This is not the first time for Dresden police to delay and obstruct investigations; this became clear in the murder case of Jorge Gomondai in 1991. Therefore, we demand the thorough solution of the murder. We will keep on critically observing the investigations.

Racism yesterday and today

Against the background of a revival of nationalism (“Wir sind ein Volk/ We are one people”) and of a political und legal vacuum in Eastern Germany since 1991 racist attacks increased all over Germany, which incredibly peaked in the pogroms in Hoyerswerda, Rostock and the murders in Mölln and Solingen. The result is a far-reaching hegemony of everyday racism in the east German society. With the abolition of the basic right of asylum, which was justified by the pogroms, the racists of majority society got what they wanted and were in victory mood.

The development of this situation pulls us through what we’re living nowadays. In opposition to other german cities, Dresden has really a few migrants. According to the concept of integration for foreigners in Dresden “most of the migrants don’t come in and go out from the eastern states of Germany voluntarely, and they leave them as soon as their residence permit allows them to”. This quote proves that something must be wrong.

We are living in a city, where refugees and migrants are attacked daily in the streets, where arson attacks are committed against restaurants of migrants regularly, where Marwa El-Sherbini was stabbed to death in the courtroom because of her muslim background. The racist atmosphere is in the air of Dresden. PEGIDA is the manifestation of a racism of societal center. This makes possible, that the citizens of Dresden-Laubegast prevent a hotel from becoming an asylumseekers accommodation with a collection of signatures and threats; or that young migrants are attacked on december 22 2014 after the PEGIDA demonstration with applause, with pepper spray, tasers and telescope batons.

Inhuman comments in social media like “One less” speak for themselves.

How does it feel to be a refugee in Dresden?

We would love to get to know our neighbors better as well as the people in our daily environment. We would enjoy to share our cultures, but unfortunetaly we find it hard to get in contact. We find it especially depressing that the people in our environment seem to show no interest in us at all. On the contrary: we are treated with hostility. Every day we experience exclusion. We live with the possibility of verbal and physical attacks. In the supermarket, in the streets and in the tram. People even leave their seats when we sit down next to them – only because of our origin.

The migrants do not understand the insults in German they are confronted with. However, it is much worse that we do not understand the threats. If someone comes to you and says: “I’m gonna kill you” – how are we supposed to understand this?

They have experienced recent monday evenings as the most frightening. After the PEGIDA-demonstrations small racist groups roam the city on manhunts. After 8 pm we are scared to leave our appartments. They told us to only move in groups, anything else would be too dangerous. But everyone should be able to move freely. We find this alarming. We came to Germany to leave violence, war, poverty and persecution behind. Our parents were happy for us having fled those circumstances. We thought to have left all of this behind us, we thought we could live freely from now on. Why can we not win peace at last? Why does nobody want to know about the reason of our flight? Why is it so hard to make friends?

Most of the people in Dresden have bad sight on refugees. They take actions against refugees like throwing bottles to the head or showing the middle finger. And at the date of 12/01/2015 the very shameful action has happened to young Eritrean Khaled Idris. He has left us. During this time all refugees were afraid and stressed. So as refugees we need solutions for our safety. We also want to make the following demands:

1. We need to know what have happened to Khaled and want to bring the murderer taken to higher court
2. We don’t feel secure to live in Dresden because many Eritreans got some actions or problems in their way. We have a language problem. So we need a translator to connect with us and translate between German and Tigrinya
3. Some part of society in Dresden does not accept refugees to live here and demonstrates against refugees every Monday evening. If they don’t accept us well we need to move to a place where we are secure.

We stand behind the Eritrean community and behind all people who are affected by the racist atmosphere in Dresden. We demand the politicians to finally ensure the refugees’ safety. We demand the Minister of the Interior, Markus Ulbig, to resign because he is not performing his duties. And, most of all, we ask the society of Dresden to take a stand against PEGIDA on mondays. We ask the associations, institutions, companies and people to finally fly the flag. Few might be affected, many are meant. PEGIDA concerns all of us! We want to stop the right to asylum being cut down by the debate on “safe countries of origin”. Instead we demand the creation of a safe exile!

NO ONE IS ILLEGAL!
REFUGEES WELCOME!
Save exile instead of “safe country of origin”!

Greetings to all antiracist and antifascist demonstrations happening today as well!

More information can be found here.